Reaction to #Budget2021

“Even by the standards of Brown, Darling, Osborne and Hammond many of the details in this Budget had been leaked in advance, prompting the Speaker and the Chairman of Ways & Means to issue a joint statement reprimanding the Chancellor. In addition, you must have been hiding under a rock not to have seen the six minute Twitter video (of Netflix quality) plus all the Sunak-branded graphics. What followed was another first: a press conference on the Budget itself. Make no mistake, this was about selling Brand Rishi and shaping opinion before the papers had their say. Judging by the editorials – not the front pages – and the immediate polling, he did his job. This populist government is playing the long game.”

Adam Honeysett-Watts, Founder & Director at do Different.

This Conservative government isn’t leaving office for many years to come. Really pleased to see £19 million announced to tackle domestic abuse in England and Wales, with funding for a network of ‘Respite Rooms’ to support homeless women and a programme to prevent re-offending. It’s an issue that is close to my heart and affects so many. All too often it is hidden and not reported.”

Aisha Cuthbert, Head of Communications at One Housing

“Slick, well-managed Budget from the Chancellor. I’m excited by the prospect of a rapid recovery but let’s hope interest rates don’t rise in the meantime. Onwards and upwards!”

Katie Perrior, Chair of iNHouse Communications

“The impact of Covid has blown away the dogma of Tory fiscal policy. This is a Chancellor acting and redefining not only the fiscal landscape but the political landscape with his ‘right thing to do’ approach to the economy.”

Kulveer Ranger, Global Head of Strategy & Communications (Financial Services & Insurance) at Atos

“A skilful Budget making the best of the terrible hand the Covid crisis has dealt him. This was the first Instagram Budget.”

Lionel Zetter, Patron of Conservatives in Communications

“The Chancellor’s decision to write into the Budget lead-in times for changes in corporation tax was a canny political move as it gives business time to bake in the adjustments and it gives him the opportunity to defer those changes to much fanfare later down the line, if the economic situation allows.”

Naomi Harris, Director at WA Communications

“A perfect combination of politically astute, of-the-moment statements and fiscally flexible future policies. But scratch below the surface and the Chancellor has outlined a titanic shift in Conservative policy towards a higher tax, bigger borrowing, expanded state. This shift must now be reconciled with the Party and decades of conservative economic policy making thus far. Sunak’s second Budget is one he’ll answer for years to come.”

Poppy Trowbridge, Strategy and board advisory

In-house trends for 2021

Aisha Cuthbert is Deputy Director of Conservatives in Communications and Head of Communications at a large housing association 

2020 was a peculiar yet interesting year for most sectors, not least for those people working in communications. For those, like me, who work in-house, there were many ups and downs. However, whatever function you provide, working as part of a team has been essential to getting through and beyond this challenging period. I look forward to meeting up with my colleagues in-person soon.

More than ever, internal communications colleagues needed to be aligned to what customer communications and public relations teams were pushing out externally. For those of us supporting industries where regulatory changes are part of the course – such as those triggered in response to Brexit, Covid-19 and the flagging economy – we needed to be up to speed and ready to tailor messages for our various audiences.

Looking ahead, what does 2021 have in-store? Here are some of my hunches.

1. Public affairs/ public policy remains critical, top priority for organisations 

With our changing world and regulations new policies will no doubt be announced and implemented quickly. Industries need to follow these developments closely and ensure that their voices are heard by the decision-makers. Those that rely on government grants or subsidies – of which there are limited public funds and resources to go round – will find themselves competing in ever-crowded markets. The smart organisations will continue to prioritise public affairs to ensure that their voice is heard.

2. Timely and compelling stakeholder communications will remain key

During times of economic uncertainty, consumers and partners will be sticking with brands that they trust and can rely on. Good customer service and clear communications is essential to this, regardless of whether you work in a B2B, B2C or B2G industry.

3. Internal communications continues to take on greater importance

Keeping your staff motivated and dedicated to providing excellent customer service will be essential in 2021. Economic uncertainty, redundancies and an ever-changing world will make that task more difficult. Internal communications professionals will need to empower line managers, giving them the tools they need to keep their teams motivated. Everything should be connected – clear message alignment with your core mission will be paramount.

Whatever 2021 brings, 2020 has had a dramatic effect on communications and the professionals that work within it. The last 12 months have demonstrated to senior leaders just how important communications is. Those with strong in-house teams are valuable because they understand the organisation’s culture, current themes, feelings and can tackle problems with persuasive and imaginative communications. Communications professionals are now seen as an essential part of forward-thinking organisations who want to survive and thrive in the years to come.

If you have ideas for the group or would like to get involved, please email us.

This piece was written for this website.