It’s time to act – and talk – tough

Last Tuesday, I was helping Dame Eleanor Laing – and her campaign to become Chairman of Ways & Means – when I was alerted about a stabbing close to Kennington tube station. For context, this is a stone’s throw away from where I live and where I had exited just moments earlier.

It’s one thing to learn about these stories in the news and on Twitter, and quite another to hear about them taking place in your backyard! This got me to thinking about other events and incidents in 2019; a year that was memorable for many reasons: some good, others not.

The death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in Syria by US forces, the resignation of John Bercow as Commons Speaker and the election victories of Scott Morrison in Australia and Boris Johnson were very good outcomes. 

The same cannot be said of the fire that destroyed the roof of Notre-Dame de Paris and the bombs on Easter Day in Sri Lanka that killed more than 250 people, the unprecedented floods in Venice and the murders of two innocents by an Islamist terrorist on London Bridge. Sadly, they weren’t alone:

  • The number of homicides in our great capital is at its highest in a decade and most of these victims were stabbed to death with knives
  • The number of children known to have been sexually groomed in the UK reached nearly 19,000 – that is five times higher than just five years ago
  • The number of migrants attempting to enter the UK illegally by crossing the English Channel rose by 400% over 2018.

I’m no policy expert – I’ll leave that to the SW1 think tanks and others. But it’s quite clear we must do more to address these epidemics – and all opinions must be heard and all ideas should be on the dinner table, including:

  • Londoners want their streets to be safe and their communities to be secure again. This May, voters should boot out Sadiq Khan and elect Shaun Bailey
  • Sajid Javid, the former Home Secretary, launched an inquiry into the ethnic origins of members of grooming gangs. Priti Patel, the new Home Secretary, should publish that report
  • And, without criticizing, she should take a much tougher stance on immigration – like Australia and Italy – by reducing arrivals with much stricter border control and speeding up deportations.

Thousands of migrants have now drowned on European sea crossings. Former Australian prime minister Tony Abbott advised EU leaders that “If you want to stop the deaths and if you want to stop the drownings you have got to stop the boats.” He argued that this is the compassionate thing to do.

As Italy’s interior minister, Matteo Salvini certainly heeded that advice. In 2016 and 2017, the numbers of non-European illegals to have landed in Italy were 181,436 and 119,369 respectively. Under his leadership that number fell by 100k. If elected prime minister, expect that number to fall further.

Back home, what can Conservatives in Communications do? We must highlight these types of issues and promote solutions, and support politicians that promise to fix them. We’re about to take back control, by leaving the EU. Let us also take back control, with respect to law and order.

If you have ideas for this group or would like to get involved please email: info@toriesincomms.org.

This piece was written for our website.

R-E-S-P-E-C-T

[UPDATED 08.01.20] Dame Eleanor Laing was subsequently elected principle Deputy Speaker and the first woman Chairman of Ways & Means with 54% in the first round.

[UPDATED 04.11.19] Dame Eleanor Laing made the final three candidates (out of 11 originally), and was the last Conservative and woman standing.

Adam Honeysett-Watts is Director of Conservatives in Communications and works in the financial technology sector. He is a former Board Member of UN Women UK and is campaigning for Dame Eleanor Laing MP to become the first woman Conservative Commons Speaker.

You’ve seen the 1970s Saatchi & Saatchi advertisement. “It was a Conservative – Mrs. Pankhurst – who first led the fight for votes for women. It was the Conservatives who first gave all women the vote 50 years ago. It was a Conservative who was the first woman to sit in Parliament. It was the Conservatives who elected the first party leader…”

We can add to that. It was a Conservative who became the first and second woman prime ministers.

Contrary to popular myth, there’s no convention that the Speakership passes from one side of the House to the other. Therefore, another Conservative milestone is achievable: on 4 November, MPs can – and should – elect Dame Eleanor Laing MP as the first woman Conservative Commons Speaker in 650 years.

@eleanor4epping Early start as it’s the #StateOpening of @UKParliament later today! MPs will spend several sitting days debating the content of the #QueensSpeech. Before that gets underway, I recorded this video about my #Speakher campaign. Let me know if you agree. #Eleanor4Speaker🙋🏼‍♀️

The Mother of Parliaments is facing one of her biggest challenges in a century. Brexit is arguably the biggest issue to impact the UK since the Second World War, Suez crisis and invasion of the Falklands. What we need now is an experienced and impartial person in the chair to restore confidence in politics.

Dame Eleanor has an impressive record – as a lawyer, MP and Deputy Speaker for six years – and she has set out a clear vision for the role that will resonate: “We must show respect for each other in Parliament, respect for Parliamentary proceedings and scrutiny, and respect for democracy and the people.”

If you have ideas for the group or would like to get involved please email: info@toriesincomms.org.

This piece was written for our website and has been republished by Politicalite (‘Another Conservative milestone is achievable this November’ – October 14, 2019).